What Tree Wardens and Pond Wardens do – and don’t do!

20150107_142604   Young people planting along the boundary 2

Tree Wardens CAN do ANY of the following, depending on their individual skills, interests and local support – but you must always do a RISK ASSESSMENT, and you should not try to do EVERYTHING:

  • planting and caring for trees, and managing local woodlands in your community
  • setting up tree nurseries
  • surveying your local trees,
  • keeping an eye out for, and (when appropriate) reporting tree disease, decay or vandalism
  • taking part in training organised by the Kent Tree and Pond Partnership, or others
  • working with local groups, youth organisations or schools, for example: seed collecting, treeplanting, tree care or surveying
  • developing initiatives such as tree adoption schemes in your area
  • leading guided tree walks and giving talks in your community
  • spearheading initiatives such as Tree Planting week, the Hedge tree campaign, the Tree care campaign, hosting the Kent Men of the Trees village trees competition or participating in the Kent AONB’s upcoming Ash Project
  • helping with, or applying for grants

Tree Wardens MUST NOT:

  • EVER advise whether a tree is safe or not – this is for the experts and volunteer wardens are not insured to do so
  • undertake practical work beyond your capabilities or without appropriate permission
  • enter private land without the owners permission
  • attempt to handle tree disputes yourselves
  • carry out chemical weed control without the certified training
  • use a chainsaw or powered tools without the necessary certified training or extra insurance
  • carry out work that disturbs wildlife during the breeding/nesting season

Pond Wardens CAN do ANY of the following, depending on their individual skills, interests and local support – but you must always do a RISK ASSESSMENT, and you should not try to do EVERYTHING:

  • identifying areas for new ponds to be created
  • planting and caring for ponds, and managing local water bodies in your community
  • surveying local ponds, for example with guidance from the Freshwater Habitats Trust
  • keeping an eye out for, and (when appropriate) reporting invasive plants, pollution or vandalism
  • taking part in training organised by the Kent Tree and Pond Partnership, or others
  • working with, and leading local groups, youth organisations or schools, or local landowners and residents, for example in: pond creation, pond care and maintenance or surveying
  • spearheading initiatives such as the Million Pond campaign, Toad Patrols and Pond Adoption schemes in your area
  • giving basic advice on garden ponds, and giving talks in your community, perhaps to existing local interest groups
  • helping with, or applying for grants

Pond wardens MUST NOT:

  • EVER advise whether a pond is safe or not – this is for the experts and volunteer wardens are not insured to do so
  • undertake practical work beyond your capabilities or without appropriate permission
  • enter private land or a pond without the owners permission
  • attempt to handle pond disputes yourselves
  • carry out chemical weed control without the certified training
  • use any powered tools without the necessary certified training or extra insurance
  • carry out work that disturbs wildlife during the breeding/nesting season